Saturday, March 29, 2008

Intel to Offer Six-Core Microprocessors for Desktops in 2010

Even though Intel Corp.’s chief executive officer once promised to start shipping octa-core microprocessors based on Nehalem micro-architecture in 2008, there will be now processors with eight cores for mass desktop market for a while. According to unofficial information, high-end desktop processor code-named Westmere due in 2010 will have six cores.
Intel’s first processor from the Nehalem family aimed at servers, workstations and high-end desktops code-named Bloomfield that is due in the second half of 2008 and is made using 45nm process technology will have four processing engines with simultaneous multi-threading technology, built-in triple-channel memory controller, 8MB of shared L3 cache as well as QuickPath interconnect bus.

Intel’s code-named Westmere processors, which are second-generation Nehalem micro-architecture processors for servers, workstations and high-end desktops, will be made using 32nm process technology and will not have many differences compared to code-named Bloomfield chips apart from six processing cores and 12MB of L3 cache. Still, it will also have certain minor enhancements, e.g., code-named La Grande SX technology (enhanced Trusted Execution Technology), AES-NI encryption support and some other, reports PC Watch web-site.

Thanks to multi-threading technology, Westmere chips will be able to execute up to 12 threads at once.

Just like Bloomfield, the six-core Westmere processor will utilize LGA1366 form-factor, though, it is unclear whether the chips will be able to share the same platform.

Officials from Intel Corp. did not comment on the news-story.

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